Oscar Wilde

Oscar Wilde

Oscar Wilde

Oscar Fingal O'Flahertie Wills Wilde was born in Dublin, Ireland on October 16, 1854 and died in Paris on November 30. 1900, a sadly brief life for such a literary genius. He is known for his flamboyancy and his humorous plays, sparkling and witty, and may be one of the most often quoted writers. He had a dark side, too, evident in his only novel, The Picture of Dorian Gray and in his play Salome. But disputes seemed to follow him, and at the height of his career, he had his lover's father, the Marquess of Queensberry prosecuted for libel. However, the trial turned on him and he was convicted of gross indecency with other men. He was sentenced to two years hard labor in 1895, at which point he lost everything. He was released in 1987, a broken man, and died several years later of cerebral meningitis. Wikipedia has an in-depth article, if you wish to read more about this gifted man.

Oscar Wilde

Plays
An Ideal Husband
The Importance of Being Earnest
Lady Windermere's Fan
Salome

Novel
The Picture of Dorian Gray

Poetry
The Ballad of Reading Gaol and Other Poems

Collected Stories
The Canterville Ghost and Other Stories

Letters
De Profundis

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