The Prisoner of Zenda Trilogy

Anthony Hope's The Prisoner of Zenda, written in 1894 became a very popular success in his time. It inspired two other novels set in the fictional German-ish country of Ruritania, Rupert of Hentzau: From the Memoirs of Fritz Von Tarlenheim, written in 1895, but not published until 1898, and The Heart of Princess Osra, published in 1896. Only Rupert of Hentau is a true sequel to The Prisoner of Zenda. It brings the story to it's needed conclusion. The Heart of Princess Osra is a charming, almost fairy tale-like story, suitable for children, about the sister of King Rudolph Elphberg, the Third, ancestor to Rudolph Elphberg, the Fifth of the present time, whose indescretions resulted in the Rassendylls of England being distant cousins. However, none of that is mentioned in the story. It is mostly about Princess Osra and her numerous suitors, which eventually leads her to her one true love. It is a fun and entertaining read, but lacks the heroic adventures and brilliant plot of the other two books in the trilogy.

Though Hope was extremely prolific, he is really considered a lesser writer, and known only for these first two books. However, thanks to the efforts of Project Gutenberg and their affiliates, many of his books are now digitized and available to the public for free. I plan to read more of his writings. My copy of The Prisoner of Zenda is in book form, but it, of course, is also available as an eBook at Project Gutenberg. The sequels, however, I did read on my Kindle. When you click on my reviews, you can reach the download page at Project Gutenberg by clicking the title.

Though all three books supposedly were available with images, the only one that actually does have images (at least as of this writing) is The Heart of Princess Osra. And there are quite a few! I have included them on this page. The artist is H.C. Edwards. Incidentally, the table of contents lacks one of the images, that found on page 66, and the image from page 101 is missing. Enjoy these great books.

The Heart of Princess Osra

Rupert of Hentzau: From the Memoirs of Fritz Von Tarlenheim

The Prisoner of Zenda

Images from The Heart of Princess Osra

Frontispiece (from page 239): "Kill him for me, then; kill him for me."
Page 11: "Take her and be Happy."
Page 37: "Stephen stood on the threshold with his staff in his hand."

Kill him for me, then; kill him for me. Take her and be Happy. Stephen stood on the threshold with his staff in his hand.

Page 56: "The physician receives Princess Osra."
Page 66: "She saw M. de Mérosailles sitting on the ground."
Page 101: "With either hand he drew a silver-mounted pistol."

The physician receives Princess Osra. She saw M. de Mérosailles sitting on the ground. With either hand he drew a silver-mounted pistol.

Page 171: "He walked with his head down and his eyes on the ground."
Page 204: "He took it and drained it."
Page 215: "On either side of it sat the priest of the village and the Miller of Hofbau."

He walked with his head down and his eyes on the ground. He took it and drained it. On either side of it sat the priest of the village and the Miller of Hofbau.

Page 252: "Forgive me, forgive me!"
Page 259: "A young man sprang up, and, with a low bow, drew aside to let her pass."
Page 263: "You are the beauty of the world,' he answered smiling."

Forgive me, forgive me! A young man sprang up, and, with a low bow, drew aside to let her pass. You are the beauty of the world,' he answered smiling.

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